Mortem Obire

Mortem Obire began as a death-doom metal project in 2006, inspired by bands like Burning Witch and Disembowelment. As the project experimented with other genres and ideas, it eventually evolved into an atmospheric drone band. Its deep and mesmerizing sound is a unique offering in the drone metal niche.

For fans of: Bass Communion, Boris, Earth, Esoteric, Hyatari, Khanate, Like Drone Razors Through Flesh Sphere, Moss, Sunn o)))

Bandcamp: https://mortemobire.bandcamp.com/ 

Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/artist/0BNtdGRvZpg1gvc7NG0HCD

Apple Music: https://music.apple.com/us/artist/mortem-obire/1025312093

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MortemObireBand

Releases

1. Demo I (17 Dec 2006)

The first demo.

2. Demo II (30 Jan 2007)

The second demo.

3. Demo III (2 April 2008)

The third demo.

4. Submission EP (13 June 2009)

Mortem Obire’s first non-demo release is a noisy and harsh EP. The first track “Raising The Headstone” is deep and fuzzy, a long distorted howl from the belly of a crypt. Its follow-up “Conversations With Devils” is dissonant and experimental.

5. Inverse Vicissitude (5 Jan 2010)

Mortem Obire’s debut album feels hollow at times, thin and stretched, like the cobwebbed basement of an abandoned castle. It isn’t as thick and distorted as the 2009 EP, and adds more reverb. The intro and outro tracks, in contrast, are reminiscent of black-and-white horror film soundtracks. This album wouldn’t be out of place backing 1922’s Nosferatu.

6. Demo IV (4 September 2011)

The fourth demo.

7. Left Hand Black (20 Sept 2012)

The second album from Mortem Obire is darker and Lovecraftian, picking up where the debut album left off. Thick rolls of guitar and bass that have barely-noticeable notes support organs and other sounds. The second track crackles and thrums with minimal guitar, the focus on a hideous choir whose words can’t be made out. The third and final track is almost calm, and certainly drones on, with unsettling high guitar notes coming in and out of the thick backing synths and low guitar notes.

8. Acta Non Verba (3 June 2013)

Mortem Obire experiments further with atmosphere in their third drone album. Remixed and remastered in 2017.

9. The Everlasting Torment (1 Jan 2014)

Mortem Obire’s fourth effort is harsh experimental drone, and includes excerpts from speeches. The guitars are often clean for the genre, with slight tempo modifications and of course plenty of space between notes. Gone are the atmospheric synths and rumbling bass of past efforts. A step in a new direction for the ever-evolving band.

10. Wrists of the Blind EP (1 May 2014)

Drone metal with ambient and noise influences. Mortem Obire’s second EP is deep and experimental, hearkening to its earlier efforts. The muffled and menacing sound is akin to the sophomore album Left Hand Black.

11. Divine Catacombs (10 March 2015)

Experimental drone and ambient. The fifth full-length album from Mortem Obire brings us to the deep, dark, and strangely calm arena of underwater graves. Floating skeletons and seaweed-wrapped shipwrecks. The meditative synths mingle with Mortem Obire’s ever-experimental guitar, thin and stretched like the band’s debut album, over the nearly hour-long “The Emperor’s Hex” track, which is split into three still-lengthy tracks. The album closes out with “Tomb of the Fallen,” a light ambient track without any guitars at all. It pays homage with keyboards alone, reminding us of what we may or may not need reminding of. This album is a bit more quiet and calm than previously released albums.

12. Postapocalyptic Visions (6 July 2015)

Split EP with Imasgrohn; collaboration with Orb Tapes and The Network Of Individualized Sonic Extremism. Mortem Obire’s 18-minute experimental drone track “Phantom Mantra (Tales From The Future Dead)” does exactly what it advertises. One listener said it’s the perfect complement to the album’s cover. Harsh and dissonant guitars spin in and out of the howling voice-like background, punctuated with piano and unspeakable noises. As the phantasmal voices fade, and their mantra subsides, the story continues. And we get a strange tale, told by those who have died, those with visions of a post-apocalyptic future.

13. Lux (29 September 2015)

Mortem Obire’s sixth album has a dark and droning atmosphere showcasing bone-shaking volcanic power. Brave the lava flows, shaking earth, and thick blackened skies of an unexpected natural disaster. Ninehertz wrote “Drone of the most doom-like quality, this is reverb central and has that lashing, punishing feel early Sunn 0))) albums had…. The three movements recorded here are long and daunting, but having spent an hour with them, you feel refreshed and uplifted, not unlike braving a dark and powerful storm.”

14. Halos (10 May 2017)

Mortem Obire’s seventh drone/ambient album picks up where 2015’s LUX left off, yet brighter. A cascading and hypnotic aural triptych which transports the listener to another realm. The lack of percussion leaves one ungrounded, free to drift or anchor themselves as they choose. The minimalistic drone is thick with synthesizer and bass in a way that's up for interpretation. Heavy reverb and crunching guitar notes round out the atmospheric yet unsettling first track, “Ascension.” “Halcyon Voyage” follows up with less guitar, adding piano to the droning bass and synths. The guitar which seeps into the end of the song is almost clean, adding a lightness to the dark grit. The third and final track, the nine-minute “The Hypnagogic Host,” is a combination of its predecessors. Long notes stretch into eternity, guitars and synth melding into something which seems almost hopeful. This album is a journey through realms most men see only in their dreams. A breath of fresh air and an experimental album that fans of drone won't want to miss.

15. Gibbering Downfall (27 May 2021)

Mortem Obire’s eighth full-length instrumental album is an atmospheric journey into dark hidden corners of the human psyche. From lava flows to deep below the ocean and more, every monolithic album showcases how the concept of death lurks around every corner. It’s the feeling of madness without going mad.

16. TBD